• 22 July 2019
Fewer Funds, Fewer Results, Finds New Study on Education Spending

Fewer Funds, Fewer Results, Finds New Study on Education Spending

Jan 15, 2018

When it comes to education results, it turns out money does talk, according to a new study on school spending and student performance after the Great Recession.

A new study from Northwestern University finds that as U.S. education spending fell 4% between 2008 – 2011 (aka the Great Recession), student test results and graduation rates suffered as well. For instance, a cut of 10% in per-student spending during a student’s years in high school reduced their chances of graduating by roughly 3%.

While school spending has increased since the dark days of the Great Recession, a Center on Budget and Policy Priorities report indicates that 29 states are still spending less per-student than they had pre-Great Recession. School spending also remains a live and contentious debate for many districts nationwide facing tighter budgets.

banner image from https://ny.chalkbeat.org/posts/us/2018/01/12/less-money-for-schools-after-the-recession-meant-lower-test-scores-and-graduation-rates-study-finds/

Less money for schools after the recession meant lower test scores and graduation rates, study finds https://ny.chalkbeat.org/posts/us/2018/01/12/less-money-for-schools-after-the-recession-meant-lower-test-scores-and-graduation-rates-study-finds/

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Clark

Clark