• 07 December 2019
Why teachers turn to tutoring

Why teachers turn to tutoring

Jan 22, 2019

Employment prospects and annual salaries for classroom teachers have reached all-time lows, with new teachers receiving an average of $38,617 in 2018—less than in the 1990s. And while turnover varies widely by state, the percentage of teachers leaving their jobs before retirement age is high. Because of low salaries, those in teaching roles are 30 percent more likely than other professionals to have a second job.

Many educators start tutoring as a logical way to earn extra income while helping students in focused, one-on-one sessions. But even those prospects can be bleak. Adding hourly work to a full-time schedule is labor-intensive and tiring. And independent tutoring is often difficult to scale. Yet, on-demand tutoring marketplaces offer notoriously low wages with capped upward mobility, and big tutoring franchises can require sums in excess of $100,000 up front to start a business with their name on it.

The good news is that those aren’t the only options...

Check out the full article on Edsurge to learn how Clark helps teachers take their tutoring enterprise to the next level, and how to maximize your impact.

About The Author

Clark

Clark